Crafting a Paranormal Romance Plot

On my “About” page, it says that I’m working on my first Male/Male Paranormal Romance. That’s true. What it leaves out is that last year I wrote a Paranormal Romance with a non-LGBT main pairing. That book, though it was published (under another pseudonym), didn’t sell a lot of copies. The problem? My suspicion is that the two elements of “paranormal” and “romance” didn’t quite fit together in my book, and potential readers picked up on that.

“It’s not enough for the paranormal and the romance elements to be present – they need to work in harmony.”

Continue reading Crafting a Paranormal Romance Plot

Shared Post: Bi-Erasure and the Patriarchy

This is an interesting blog post that raises some important questions about how bisexuality is viewed by society, and some of the reasons that the author thinks could be to blame.

I have always questioned my sexual identity. I remember being in primary school, ten years old and feeling awkward over having crushes on girls. I always thought that there must be something wrong with me and that I must be some sort of pervert. Coming into my teen years I continued having feelings for girls […]

via My Experience with Sexuality and why the Patriarchy is (partly) to blame for Bi Erasure. —
Follow Lavender Writing on WordPress.com

Shared Post: Basic Tips for Beta Readers

These tips from Leigh M. Lorien pretty much totally sum up the job of a beta reader. If you’re thinking of offering your services, or looking to get some beta readers to look over your work, take a look!

A while back, I wrote a thread on Twitter with some quick tips on beta reading. I’m going to expand on this a little bit here. First off, let’s get some terminology straightened out. Beta reader – Your job as a beta reader is to tell the writer overall thoughts, point out areas where you […]

via Basic Tips for Beta Readers — Leigh M. Lorien
Follow Lavender Writing on WordPress.com

Labels

“You’re  gay,” she said. “Just admit that you’re gay! I’d be happy. I’ve always wanted to have a gay best friend!”

The summer sun was drifting low in the sky, there was a smell of freshly cut grass, and she had a new boyfriend. Maybe that made her more enthusiastic than usual to define my sexuality. But it wasn’t the first time we’d had this conversation. My response was the same as it had always been.

“But I’m not gay,” I said. “If I was gay, I’d say so. I’m not homophobic, I wouldn’t be ashamed, I’d tell you if I was gay.”

What I didn’t say, what I could never say, was I’m straight.

“At the age of 35, it was like a light finally being switched on.”

Continue reading Labels