Shared Post: Changing Telling into Showing

The old advice of “show don’t tell” is really important. This is a great little post about reducing the number of “telling” sections and swapping them for “showing”.

“Show don’t tell” is probably the most commonly given advice in writing. So why is it so important?

via Changing Telling into Showing — ML Keller- The Manuscript Shredder
Follow Lavender Writing on WordPress.com

Fiction: Morning Conversation

I sat in the compartment alone until after we pulled out of Bristol Temple Meads. It was early, the light just creeping across the July sky, turning fields and towns first grey then hazy pink. The distant puff and chuckle of the engine, combined with the rhythmic beat of the tracks below almost lulled me back to sleep, my eyelids drooping pleasantly as I watched the light English drizzle spatter the car window. The vague scent of tobacco that lingered in the fabric of the seats reminded me of my father, a man I admired, looked up to and emulated, following him first into the air force, then into civilian life as an accountant.

If there was one man who never showed me an ounce of kindness, it was my father.

“He would have his hair cut or he would find another job.”

Continue reading Fiction: Morning Conversation

Internalised Fear of Anal Sex

“Right, we need to talk about anal sex,” she said, looking very uncomfortable. There were a few giggles that went unacknowledged. “It’s dangerous. That… area… is designed for things to come out of, not go into. It’s also dirty.”

Incongruously, the smell of fresh baking drifted on the air. This was, after all, the cookery department.

Her face was already red, so she simply added, “Up until quite recently it was also illegal.”

Continue reading Internalised Fear of Anal Sex

Shared Post: Biphobia in Fiction

Using specific examples from YA fiction, this post deals with a lot of the stereotypes around fictional bisexual characters and why they’re not OK to perpetuate.

Welcome back to another Trope Tuesday! This is a weekly meme hosted by A.J. @ Lacy Literacy where we discuss a specific trope and decide: yes, indifferent, or throw it off a cliff? Today I’m going to be talking about something near and dear to my heart: biphobia in YA. (TW: biphobia, slut-shaming, brief discussion […]

via Trope Tuesday | Biphobic Tropes That Need To Die — the story salve
Follow Lavender Writing on WordPress.com

Quick Thoughts: Fragrance in Fiction

Smell is one of the most often overlooked senses in fiction, yet it can be one of the most powerfully evocative if used well. Including the scents present in a scene can be used to add texture, depth and even personality.

Continue reading Quick Thoughts: Fragrance in Fiction

Crafting a Paranormal Romance Plot

On my “About” page, it says that I’m working on my first Male/Male Paranormal Romance. That’s true. What it leaves out is that last year I wrote a Paranormal Romance with a non-LGBT main pairing. That book, though it was published (under another pseudonym), didn’t sell a lot of copies. The problem? My suspicion is that the two elements of “paranormal” and “romance” didn’t quite fit together in my book, and potential readers picked up on that.

“It’s not enough for the paranormal and the romance elements to be present – they need to work in harmony.”

Continue reading Crafting a Paranormal Romance Plot

Shared Post: Bi-Erasure and the Patriarchy

This is an interesting blog post that raises some important questions about how bisexuality is viewed by society, and some of the reasons that the author thinks could be to blame.

I have always questioned my sexual identity. I remember being in primary school, ten years old and feeling awkward over having crushes on girls. I always thought that there must be something wrong with me and that I must be some sort of pervert. Coming into my teen years I continued having feelings for girls […]

via My Experience with Sexuality and why the Patriarchy is (partly) to blame for Bi Erasure. —
Follow Lavender Writing on WordPress.com

Shared Post: Basic Tips for Beta Readers

These tips from Leigh M. Lorien pretty much totally sum up the job of a beta reader. If you’re thinking of offering your services, or looking to get some beta readers to look over your work, take a look!

A while back, I wrote a thread on Twitter with some quick tips on beta reading. I’m going to expand on this a little bit here. First off, let’s get some terminology straightened out. Beta reader – Your job as a beta reader is to tell the writer overall thoughts, point out areas where you […]

via Basic Tips for Beta Readers — Leigh M. Lorien
Follow Lavender Writing on WordPress.com

Labels

“You’re  gay,” she said. “Just admit that you’re gay! I’d be happy. I’ve always wanted to have a gay best friend!”

The summer sun was drifting low in the sky, there was a smell of freshly cut grass, and she had a new boyfriend. Maybe that made her more enthusiastic than usual to define my sexuality. But it wasn’t the first time we’d had this conversation. My response was the same as it had always been.

“But I’m not gay,” I said. “If I was gay, I’d say so. I’m not homophobic, I wouldn’t be ashamed, I’d tell you if I was gay.”

What I didn’t say, what I could never say, was I’m straight.

“At the age of 35, it was like a light finally being switched on.”

Continue reading Labels